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Why I Signed The Contract For The Web

I have signed the Contract For The Web. There. Why did I do this? What is this thing I have signed? Will I benefit from signing it? There are more questions I could open this Blog post with, but, read on and I will try and explain why I am making bold steps towards being a more wholesome and ethical web designer. A web designer who will not work for nefarious purposes and one who will and be as inclusive as possible.

The Web was designed to bring people together and make knowledge freely available. It has changed the world for good and improved the lives of billions. Yet, many people are still unable to access its benefits and, for others, the Web comes with too many unacceptable costs.

Everyone has a role to play in safeguarding the future of the Web. The Contract for the Web was created by representatives from over 80 organisations, representing governments, companies and civil society, and sets out commitments to guide digital policy agendas. To achieve the Contract’s goals, governments, companies, civil society and individuals must commit to sustained policy development, advocacy, and implementation of the Contract text. Here are some key points I took away from the text, and that I have backed…

1. By giving people control over their privacy and data rights, with clear and meaningful choices to control processes involving their privacy and data.

The Charter Of The Internet

Principle 5.1

2. By supporting corporate accountability and robust privacy and data protection by design.

The Charter Of The Internet

Principle 5.2

3. By making privacy and data rights equally available to everyone.

The Charter Of The Internet

Principle 5.3

Half of the world’s population still can’t get online. For the other half, the web’s benefits seem to come with far too many unacceptable risks: to our privacy, our democracy, our health and our security.

Now for the first time ever, we have a global plan of action — the Contract for the Web — created by experts and citizens from across the world to make sure our online world is safe, empowering and genuinely for everyone. We invite governments, companies, civil society organisations and individuals to back the Contract and uphold its principles and clauses.

The Contract for the Web will become a strong mechanism for each party to be held accountable for doing their part to build an open and free web. And, now, I am a Backer of the Contract For The Web. So, to answer the questions I posed in the header, I signed the Contract For The Web because I want everyone to have what I have; a good understanding of the internet. I solve problems for a living so I’ve backed this Contract. A Contract which rules that tech Illiteracy will be less than 30% of the world’s population by 2025 – tech illiteracy, on a web that is not free and open, is an obstacle to me further developing my full potential. It would, indeed, be a missed opportunity for humanity. It took all of us to build the web that we have. It will take all of us to secure its future.

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